Security.org's Research team has released a comprehensive report that looks at data privacy laws across the U.S.

A state-by-state review of legislation shows that for all the talk about protecting consumers’ digital lives, even California’s new law only covers eight of the 15 most important data privacy rights

In the report, you will find an overview of these 15 critical areas, where privacy advocates generally agree, as well as a state-by-state breakdown of digital privacy. The analysis is broken down into five buckets: very strong, strong, pending, weak and very weak with the following headline findings:

* Strong: California, Maine, Nevada

* Pending: Arizona, Florida, Illinois, Maryland, Minnesota, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New York, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Virginia, Wisconsin

* Weak: Connecticut, Hawaii, Louisiana, Massachusetts, North Dakota, Texas

* Very weak: Alabama, Alaska, Arkansas, Colorado, Delaware, Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, New Jersey, New Mexico, Ohio, Oregon, South Dakota, Tennessee, Utah, Vermont, Washington, West Virginia, Wyoming

Read the full report here:

47 States Have Weak or Nonexistent Consumer Data Privacy Laws - Security.org
Last Updated April 16, 2020 By Gabe Turner and the Security.org Team “It’s like the wild wild west,” Emily Mancini, communications director for New York State Sen. Kevin Thomas (D), says, “for businesses and consumers alike.” A bold comparison, perhaps, but one that’s not altogether incorrect. No, w…

Our hope in sending this is to provide you and your team with better data and resources as we try to bring more transparency to the broadband marketplace and close the digital divide.  

If you have any questions about the report or the data, please do not hesitate to reach out.

Ana DeCastro, Outreach Specialist, BroadbandNow

ana@broadbandnow.com

broadbandnow.com/mission